Tamoxifen Blues…Up In Smoke?

I’ve never been a fan of taking pills.  I’m one of those people who really read the Patient Information Insert that gets stapled to my prescription bag.  And I believe what I read.  That’s why I’m not a fan of taking pills.  Take antibiotics.  (Or don’t…)  How many of you know the frustration of finishing off the horse pill that takes away your upper respiratory infection only to find yourself making a new appointment with your OB/GYN to get the “magic bullet” to cure (more…)

Whatever Gets You Through

I am hoping that your “dirty” language makes you feel better.

I had a double mastectomy in July 2008 for breast cancer. Chemo treatments and 33 Radiation treatments. Lost all my hair, sick as a poisioned dog from chemo and burned terribly from radiation–but never once did say such filthy things.

I prayed to the Lord of Heaven, Jesus Christ that whatever I was and would be going through would be for His Glory. I am praying that you can do the same this very day and that your life will be turned to the glory of the Lord.

Nancy J Leimer
2 Year Cancer Survivor

This is one of the responses I did’t post (more…)

Prayer Enfolds Us

A friend of mine gave me a gift shortly after I was diagnosed with breast cancer:  a prayer shawl.  She had tears in her eyes as she handed me the package and told me what it was.  The shawl is one created by a group of women who come together and share scripture and hope and love and prayers while crocheting or knitting the wraps.  My shawl is made from a variegated aqua blue, green, and white soft-as-kitten-fur yarn.  The stitches are snugged together tight enough that you can’t poke your fingers through, yet loose enough that it has give when you wrap it around your shoulders.  When I throw it around me I imagine (more…)

A Touchy Subject: Breast Suppleness

I’ve read women’s accounts and listened to women describe disappointment and frustration over the firmness or hardness of their breast weeks, months, even years after lumpectomy and radiation.   Throw in the gnarled tender scar that lies just beneath the surface of the skin and fear jumps up front and center.

I remember the first time I tried to touch my wound the day after surgery.  My site had been finished (or top coated as I imagined) with some kind of industrial body glue which left the side of my breast feeling waxy (more…)